Frequently asked questions

Testosterone is a hormone produced naturally by the testicles, and is important for a man’s physical and emotional well-being. It’s responsible for many things in the body, including the normal growth of muscle and bone, the production of sperm, and the desire to have sex. Find out more about testosterone and TD.

It’s quite common actually. 8% of men in the UK aged between 50 and 79 are affected by testosterone deficiency.  Find out more about TD.

Common symptoms of testosterone deficiency include tiredness, reduced well-being, low mood or depression, loss of concentration, hot flushes and sweats, weight gain, male breasts, loss of muscle mass and strength, as well as loss of body hair. Sexual symptoms include reduced sex drive, problems with getting or keeping an erection, and difficulty in achieving orgasm. Some men with testosterone deficiency have all of these symptoms, while others may only have a few. None of these symptoms are specific to testosterone deficiency, so it is important to talk to a doctor to make sure that testosterone deficiency is not confused with other medical conditions. Find out more about the signs and symptoms of testosterone deficiency.

The chances of finding testosterone deficiency are higher when men have certain other conditions such as obesity, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and osteoporosis.

Improvements in overall health could help to boost low testosterone naturally. Maintaining a healthy weight, staying active, reducing stress and getting enough rest will all have a positive effect on testosterone levels. Eating a healthy, balanced diet will help improve general well-being. Consult a doctor to get dietary advice.

Assessing whether a man has testosterone deficiency may take several appointments with a GP or specialist. As well as noting a man’s symptoms, a blood test is needed to measure the testosterone levels so that testosterone deficiency can be diagnosed. The blood test should be performed in the morning. In case the first blood test is abnormal, another one should be done on a different day, in the morning, to confirm the diagnosis. Find out more about what will happen at the doctors.

Having testosterone deficiency may lead to a low sperm count, but testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) may also do the same – the relationship between testosterone levels and sperm production is complicated. If infertility in a man with testosterone deficiency is a concern, seek the advice of a doctor.

TRT stands for testosterone replacement therapy. This is used to treat testosterone deficiency. The aim of TRT is to return testosterone levels back to normal to improve quality of life. Different types of TRT include gels applied to the skin and injections. Find out more about the treatment options for testosterone deficiency.

The treatments available for testosterone deficiency vary in how easy they are to use and whether they act over a short or long period of time. Some can be administered daily at home, such as the gels applied to the skin, while others, such as injections, may require a trip to the doctors every 2-3 weeks, or 10-14 weeks. Find out more about the treatment options for testosterone deficiency.

The aim of TRT is to return testosterone levels back to normal to improve quality of life. Find out more about the treatment options for testosterone deficiency.

As with any treatment, there may be side effects. It’s best to talk to a doctor about the different treatment options for testosterone deficiency so that the most suitable treatment can be chosen.

The aim of TRT is to return testosterone levels back to normal, not raise them to excessively high levels. Because of this, TRT is rarely linked with aggressive behaviour.

The aim of TRT is to return testosterone levels back to normal to improve quality of life. So that testosterone deficiency symptoms don’t return, TRT will need to be taken long-term under the guidance of a doctor with assessments made at 3, 6, and 12 months after initiating TRT, and then annually thereafter.